I found this article in the United Cerebral Palsy’s monthly newsletter, “Full Spectrum,” and thought it was worth sharing.   15 Things Never to Say to a Special Needs Parent

I am sure that most of us have been confronted by at least one or two of these seemingly well-meaning comments.  Personally, I always try to remind myself that people are doing the best they can in what may be an uncomfortable situation for them.  And, in addition to the unpleasant comments I’ve heard, I’ve also been asked questions in incredibly gentle and caring ways.  I’ve been amazed at the ability of some people to make a kind, casual statement or question about Olivia’s situation that I never could have thought of myself (and you would think that we parents of children with special needs would know exactly what to say…not always true!).  My favorite questions usually come from children, because those are the ones that are most honest and innocent, and therefore the easiest to answer.  And, children tend to ask Olivia questions directly, instead of asking me.  They don’t assume that just because she is in a wheelchair or wearing AFOs that she can’t talk to them.  Leave it to the little ones to be the wisest!